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Saturday, June 2, 2018

An Extraordinary Chapter--A New Beginning for Franciscans in the US

   As I shared news this week that 6 of the 7 US provinces met in chapter and decided to merge into one province several people asked, "What is a Chapter?"  Good question. Sometimes the workings of religious orders are a mystery even to practicing Catholics so I thought I would shed some light on how we operate. In religious orders members meet periodically to elect leaders, pass legislation and to take stands on various issues in the Church and the world.  In our Franciscan order there are general chapters, usually held in Assisi, every 6 years, to elect the leadership for the order.  In each province chapters are held every three years.  These are ordinary chapters.

   Occasionally an extraordinary chapter is held, not for the usual purpose, but for some specific reason.  In 1967 my province, Holy Name, met in extraordinary chapter to implement clearly the changes called for by Vatican II.  This past week 6 of the seven US provinces met in extraordinary chapter to decide whether or not to become one province.  The motion passed in all 6 provinces and will go to our leadership in Rome for final approval. The full implementation of this merger will take about 4-5 years.  In the meantime we are fully engaged in collaboration and cooperation with each other.

   With this explanation I would like to share my own experience of participating in this process which began several years ago when each province faced the fact that the present situation, with diminishing numbers, was not sustainable.  From the point on there have been several inter-provincial meetings as well as a coming together of our formation programs.  The recent chapter then did not come out of the blue.  It was carefully prepared for.

  More important than the result for me was the fact that the chapter was a deeply spiritual experience.  Believe me when I tell you that sometimes they are more political than spiritual.  We are, after all, human beings.  At this gathering there was a palpable sense of the presence of the Holy Spirit guiding our deliberations.  Many fears and doubts were expressed but in the end we decided to stretch beyond our comfort zone and do what was best both for the Church and the order in our country. There were friars voting against the motion to unify but after results were published they seemed to unify behind the proposal.  Also, with the help of modern technology the results were broadcast to each of the 6 provinces at the same time, leaving us with a sense of unity with all of our brothers across the country.  I was personally buoyed and uplifted by participating in this great event.

  I do ask that you keep all of us in your prayers as we move in the years ahead towards full implementation of this great decision.

  



Monday, May 21, 2018

Thoughts from a Wandering Friar--A New direction for this blog.



   I have received several e-mails and had comments made in conversations as to why I have not posted on this blog in a while. There is no simple answer to this question.  For one thing I have been sensing that I am not adding much to the conversation about what's going on in our world and I refuse to get drawn in to the angry ranting that passes for intelligent conversation.  I do admit that on a few occasions I have fallen into that trap.

  Secondly I realize that this blog did not have a clear focus.  That can be OK.  This is not a newspaper or magazine with deadlines for writers and an editorial position for the product.

   With all of the above taken into consideration from now on my blog will be about my ministry of preaching, especially preaching parish missions and retreats for religious, but also my work with Unbound. See Unbound. See as well my own Unbound outreach page in the Links section to the right. I will present thoughts on my preaching themes as well as comments (always positive) on the people and places that I visit, as well as occasionally talking about the overall direction of my ministry.

   As we approach the end of May  will be having a busy summer, one that began early last week with an Unbound campaign in Rockport, TX.  Rockport is about 33 miles north of Corpus Christi. I arrived there on a Friday and observed right away the devastating effects that Hurricane Harvey had on the area with many homes and places of business damaged or even totally destroyed, including the parish center at Sacred Heart Parish.  My heart sank and I thought, "How can people who have suffered all this find their way to sponsoring a child or needy elder in another country?"  Nonetheless I carried on and 44 people came forward to become sponsors.  That generosity deeply moved me and was a humbling reminder of God at work even in very difficult circumstances.  A big thank you to the people of Rockport. TX.

   The months ahead have me going to Arkansas,Louisiana, California and Delaware to preach for Unbound.  I will likely have a few more commitments for them.  I will also be preaching a retreat for the Sisters of St. Joseph in Clarence, NY.

   At  the end of June I will be presiding at a wedding in Texas. The groom is a young man that I first met in Eagle River, WI in 1995.   I have come to know his family very well and it will be a delight to be part of that great celebration when Caleb and Sunny get married,  After that I head for Albuquerque for meeting priests.

   Perhaps the moist important event of the summer will happen in Loudonville, NY from May 29-31. All the friars of my province, joined with friars from all over the US who will meet with their respective provinces will vote to possibly merge into one province.  Please pray for us. I will let you know not only the outcome, but what the experience was like.



Table with folders for people to be sponsored.




   

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

My God, My God, Why Have You Forsaken Me?

  I have been a priest for almost 47 years and a traveling preacher for the past 30 years.  During parish missions people often come to me feeling that their faith has been stretched to the limit.  They pray and pray for something--to overcome an illness, to deal with a difficult family problem or life situation and there seems to be no answer.  They wonder, "Where are You God with all that is going on in my life?"

   This past Sunday was Palm Sunday, or also Passion Sunday.  The account of the Passion of Christ from one of the synoptic Gospels is always read, usually by the priest and two other readers.  From the cross Jesus cries out, "My God, My God, Why have you forsaken Me?"  The picture at the top of this article quotes Matthew. This year it was from Mark 15:34.  How can this be?  Jesus, after all, is the eternal Word of the Father, always one with the Father and the Spirit. How then, can He be forsaken by God?

   Over the centuries there have been several attempts at answering this question and all of them are valid.  For one thing it is good to point out that these words are the beginning of a Psalm 22. Jesus is speaking the first line of a psalm that expresses deep lament at the sufferings the writer is going through but it ends on a note of hope.  In verses 25-27 we read, "For he has not spurned or disdained the misery of this poor wretch, Did not turn away from me, but heard me when I cried out. I will offer praise in the great assembly:my vows I will fulfill before those who fear him. The poor will eat their fill: those who seek the Lord will offer praise. May your hearts enjoy life forever."

   The psalmist is certainly feeling desperation,, but in the end his prayer is answered.  But what are we to think of Jesus crying out and feeling forsaken by God?  Yes, Jesus is the eternal Word of the Father and in the core of His being always one with the Father,  but He is also so radically and fully human that He experiences this sense of abandonment by God that we humans experience and as He cries out from the cross He cries it out for all of us.  At the same time we need to look at the whole psalm because it gives us hope in two ways.  The first is that the Lord is with us in our moments of feeling abandoned by God. The second is that if we do not abandon hope we, like Jesus in His Resurrection, will find deliverance, and not only personal deliverance, but deliverance from injustice and poverty.

   During the rest of this Holy Week, and especially on Good Friday, let us pray out not only our personal experiences of abandonment and desperation, but also those of the poor, oppressed and marginalized of the world, not in anger and rebellion against God, but with the hope that His Resurrection brings.

   

  

Friday, February 16, 2018

Healing the Anger Within Us, A Task for our Times.

   Once again another school shooting. Once again thoughts and prayers are offered.  Once again there are discussions about gun control and mental health.  Thought, prayers, discussions and above all actions are necessary to resolve this issue, but it strikes me that there is another, a deeper dimension to this problem that we are not facing, a spiritual and emotional one that applies to all of us.

   One psychologist made the statement that most of the perpetrators of these horrible crimes are not truly mentally ill.  They are ANGRY, excessively and over the top, but they are ANGRY.  Anger in and of itself is not a mental health problem, nor is it always inappropriate.  Anger is an emotion that motivates us to strive to correct injustice, both great social injustices and individual grievances. The non-violent expression of anger by people like Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. did a great deal of good for the world.

   The individuals that have gone on violent, gun shooting rampages are extreme examples of anger gone rampant.  I would suggest though that rather than isolating them from ourselves we look in the mirror and recognize that they are ourselves, even though the great majority of us will never go to their extremes.

   Our political and even religious discourse lately is filled with venomous anger.  It is one thing to disagree with a politician or a theologian or the guy next door, or even to be angry if we believe that their position is wrong and harmful to others, but when the discussion spills over into vulgar name calling and wishing evil upon others we have a problem.

   Another aspect of our cultural anger problem is seen in our reaction to some of the more heinous crimes that get committed, be that pedophilia, mass shootings, rape and abuse, etc.  There is no doubt that the perpetrators of such crimes as well as the people that cover for them belong behind bars, but I look on social media and find people wishing them to be tortured and humiliated. To me this is just self-righteous posturing and a way of saying, "I may be bad, but not as bad as those people."

    The perpetrators of these violent shootings are not totally distinct from the rest of us.  They are rather at the top end of a spectrum which envelopes us all.

   We Catholics, along with many other Christians, are in the season of Lent, a season of self-examination and repentance.  Perhaps a good Lenten practice would be to look into our own hearts and ask the Good Lord to heal us of all of the pent up anger that comes out in things like road rage, angry ranting, etc.  I mentioned above that healthy anger helps us correct injustice.  Much anger does not get resolved and we are left with a residue of unresolved anger, a residue that began building up when we were mere children.  Much of it was justified in the beginning, but now it is a poison, a spiritual poison that does no harm to those who hurt us originally, but only harms ourselves.

   A number of years ago I realized that this Franciscan priest had way too much anger.  The mere mention of certain teachers, people from my childhood and folks from the early days of my religious life would make my blood boil.  Instead of stuffing this anger back down I started the practice of praying for the person who angered me and asking the Lord to take that anger away.  It's a slow process and I still have some things to work on, but I am a much more peaceful man today than I was just a few years ago.

   Perhaps such a process is needed for all of us, even those with no religious beliefs, if we are to heal the ills of our society.  Yes, laws must change on several levels but without changing our hearts nothing will really change.

    While I have no illusions that this is the ultimate insight into everything I believe it is worthwhile for all to discuss.  I wouldn't mind of this post went viral.

Monday, January 29, 2018

Lent is coming, Time to do Penance


   In a few short weeks the season of Lent will be upon us.  Catholics as well as many other Christians, will be giving thought to what they might do for Lent, what type of penance to undertake. A good beginning is to visit the three-pronged approach to this practice--prayer, fasting and almsgiving.  Focusing on these three, and not just on fasting (sacrificing, giving up) helps us to go beyond a trap that can really be ego-driven because Lent is not just about "what I give up", but about deepening our relationship with the Lord through prayer, and expressing our concern for the poor.  Our fasting should be fueled by these two to insure balance.

   I would invite my readers to include the above, but to go beyond it.  We need to take a look at the meaning of the word repent, or do penance  as found in the Gospel.  Mark's Gospel, the most direct and to the point of the four, has Jesus, right after His baptism by John in the Jordan, going to Galilee and proclaiming the message, "This is the time of fulfillment. The kingdom of God is at hand. Repent, and believe in the Gospel."

   Jesus here is not just saying, "Be sorry for your sins and believe in the Gospel."  He is rather inviting His followers to make a radical shift on how they view life, not viewing it from the perspective of the leaders of this world or of the various ideologies offered by this world. He is inviting us to make a whole new basis for our life and for the decisions we make.

   One of the challenges for Christians today is to realize that we tend to get caught in a trap. We want the Gospel and Jesus and the Kingdom to be the source of meaning in our life but we compromise that stance with our loyalty to political parties, politicians and different ideologies. We live in the real world. As Americans we have to choose whom to vote for and what party to back, and that is fine, but as we do so can we admit that in the present state of affairs our decision is always a compromise.

    It is not only the world of politics that traps us but the various competing ideologies tossed at us by news media, talk shows, etc.

   Perhaps for Lent we can read and meditate on the 9th chapter of John's Gospel, the story of the man born blind.  This story is not about physical, but spiritual blindness.  The Pharisees cannot admit that they are blind.  Jesus tells them that there would be no sin in admitting blindness but tells them, "We see, you say, and so your sin remains." (Jn 9, 41)

    Maybe, just maybe, this Lent we can say to the Lord, " I am blind.  My vision is cloudy.  I see You, Your values, but I cling on to some others.  My blindness leads me to make idols of political parties and ideologies, to make idols of personalities and politicians.  Help me to see Lord. Help me to make your Gospel and the Reign of your Father, the basis for every decision in my life."

   If you do this I promise you:

A) You will have inner peace.

B) May people, including your friends, will misunderstand you

That is my experience anyway




















Tuesday, December 12, 2017

El Salvador, Part IV--Visiting a truly Holy Place.

At the Romero Shrine

Portrait of Archbishop Romero















Archbishop Romero's blood-stained vestment
Our final day in El Salvador was one of the most moving experiences of my life.  On the way to the airport and our journey back to the US we stopped in San Salvador at the shrine dedicated to Archbishop Oscar Romero who was martyred in 1980 because of his speaking out on behalf of the poor of his country. His simple apartment on the grounds of a hospital is no a shrine.  Walking through there was a palpable sense of being in a holy place.

   After that visit we went into the chapel to celebrate the Eucharist together with the Unbound community from that city. We were It was in this chapel that he was murdered while saying Mass.  I was the presider at the Mass and the knowledge of what happened at the altar where I was celebrating the Mass filled me with emotions that are hard to describe. I will let the pictures and the video of my homily (In Spanish and English) tell the rest of the story

In front of the altar flags of Unbound countries and pictures of Unbound founders.

Franciscan Sisters provided the music

At the Consecration




El Salvador, Part III--A Trip into the mountains and a Visit with Scholars

Beautiful mountain scenery

  It was Sunday. We needed to celebrate the Eucharist. There were several churches nearby in Santa Ana, but we drove for 90 minutes over winding dirt roads and beautiful scenery. It was wonderful because it gave us a sense of the beauty of this wonderful country. There were several small farms and not a few sheep, goats cattle and other animals.

   At the end of our journey was the town of Los Apoyos where the Unbound community warmly greeted us.  I must say that the greetings we received throughout this trip were truly humbling.  The people so deeply appreciate what sponsorship is doing for them.
Passing men riding on horseback

 After the Mass we were treated to a wonderful display of El Salvadoran culture, a display that showed us the richness of what sponsorship does. Sponsored children, elders and their families by developing their talents grow in confidence and with that with hope for the possibilities that await them in the future.

   On the way back to Santa Ana we visited the beautiful cathedral there and shared a great dinner at a local restaurant.

  

Mass at Los Apoyos

Entrance into the Church
Fr. Jerry Frank preaching the homily
The Santa Ana Cathedral

   On Monday morning we stayed at the center and several of the Unbound sponsored teenagers and scholarship students came to pray and share with us.  Once again it was a deeply moving experience not only because of their presentations but especially because of the informal chats we had while sharing breakfast with them.  For those unfamiliar with Unbound it is good to know that as sponsored children reach the later years of their education they can apply for scholarships.  Their stories showed that Unbound really does see possibility and not poverty when dealing with people. They desired to be doctors, teachers, social workers, lawyers, and one of them an electrical engineer. Although I am certain that when they attain their goals they will have material success, not one of them mentioned that.  They all spoke of how they hoped to be of service to the people of their country